Met officer Jonathon Cobban and ex-PC Joel Borders were sentenced to prison for exchanging offensive WhatsApp messages with Sarah Everard’s killer.

officer Jonathon Cobban

Met officer Jonathon Cobban and ex-PC Joel Borders were sentenced to prison for exchanging offensive WhatsApp messages with Sarah Everard’s killer.

A Metropolitan Police officer and his former colleague were jailed for 12 weeks after sharing grossly offensive messages in a WhatsApp group with Sarah Everard’s killer – and then released on bail pending an appeal.

Met constable Jonathon Cobban, 35, and former PC Joel Borders, 45, were convicted of the charges in September.

Earlier this year, the pair and Wayne Couzens were discovered to be members of a chat group called “Bottle and Stoppers.”

Couzens is currently serving a life sentence for the kidnapping, rape, and murder of Ms Everard, 33, in March of last year, while he was a police officer.

officer Jonathon Cobban

Cobban and Borders were discovered in the group to have exchanged messages about tasering children and people with disabilities, as well as referring to Hounslow as a “Somali s*******” in 2019.

Borders wrote on April 5, that year, “I can’t wait to get on guns so I can shoot some c*** in the face!”

Cobban replied: “Me too. I’d like to taser a cat and a dog to see which one reacts the best. I believe the cat will p***** off more and the dog will s***. I’d like to put this theory to the test. Children are the same way. You little f******, zap zap.”

Borders joked about raping a female coworker in the same month, referring to her as a “sneaky b****.”

District Judge Sarah Turnock sentenced Cobban and Borders to 12 weeks in prison, saying she couldn’t think of “more grossly offensive messages,” but released them on bail pending an appeal to the High Court.

“They encapsulated the entire spectrum of prejudiced views, racism, misogyny, ableism, and homophobia,” the judge stated.

“There was no intent on the part of the defendants to cause any harm to the persons to whom these messages refer or the minor groups of society who are undoubtedly impacted by these messages,” she added.

“Knowing police officers find it funny to joke about them in such a deeply offensive manner will undoubtedly cause great distress to the people to whom these messages refer.”

The messages, according to the judge, “represent jokes specifically targeted or about people or groups as police officers had sworn an oath to protect.”

“There is no doubt that these offenses have caused significant harm to public trust in policing.”

source nsemwokrom.com

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